Saturday, June 24, 2017

WNPR Public Radio Interview: Michael Maglaras

WNPR arts reporter, Ray Hardman, caught up with director Michael Maglaras this week to talk about his new film "America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age."

"Those are the 45 years in which the American arts movement came into his own -- great paintings, sculpture, literature," said Maglaras, "but as we try to say in the film, that's the period where the American artistic presence in the world really is first felt."

Listen to the full interview at this link.

Opera House to Present Meet the Filmmaker Event


“We are very excited to be screening this film and to have the filmmakers available to talk about its creation,” notes Opera House Executive Director Rick Davis. “As part of our effort to offer a wide variety of intriguing programming, we believe this event will appeal not only to lovers of art and history, but to movie buffs as well.”

The 1891 Fredonia Opera House will present a recent film from Filmmaker Michael Maglaras titled “America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age on Thursday, June 29, at 7:30 p.m., as part of its Art & Architecture: On Screen series. To celebrate local artists, the Opera House has partnered with members of the North Shore Arts Alliance on a special art installation at the Opera House from 6:30-7:30pm, immediately prior to the screening. The exhibit will include work by artists including Katherine Galbraith who created portraits at the National Gallery of Art under their Copyist Program, both of them from portraits by John Singer Sargent including this one of Mrs. Henry White.

The 1891 Fredonia Opera House will present a recent film from Filmmaker Michael Maglaras titled “America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age” on Thursday, June 29, at 7:30 p.m., as part of its Art & Architecture: On Screen series. Maglaras and Producer Terri Templeton will introduce the film and will lead a talk-back and Q&A following its screening. In addition, the Opera House has partnered with the North Shore Arts Alliance to present an exhibition of local artists’ works at the Opera House immediately prior to the screening.
“America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age” tells the story of the painting, the sculpture, the music, and the literature of America’s renaissance … the tremendous outpouring of artistic endeavor that occurred between the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865 and the death of Mark Twain in 1910.
Read the full article at this link.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

New York Premiere of Documentary on the Art of the Gilded Age


A Meet the Filmmaker Event with Michael Maglaras

On June 29 at 7:30pm, filmmaker Michael Maglaras returns to The 1891 Fredonia Opera House in Fredonia, New York for the screening of his new film, America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age.  Opera House audiences will remember Michael from his appearance in 2016 with his film Enough to Live On: The Arts of the WPA.  Michael and his wife, producer Terri Templeton, will lead a talk-back and Q&A session following the screening of the film. 

America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age tells the story of the painting, the sculpture, the music and the literature of America's renaissance ... the tremendous outpouring of artistic endeavor that occurred between the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865 and the death of Mark Twain in 1910.

Employing more than 90 paintings, drawings, photographs, and sculptural works by such important America artists as John Singer Sargent, Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer, Alfred Stieglitz, and Augustus Saint-Gaudens, writer/director Michael Maglaras tells the story of the rising of American society through the voices of some of its most creative spirits.  

Michael Maglaras has been hailed as a "virtuoso filmmaker."  He founded 217 Films in 2003 with the aim of introducing a new audience to the rich history of the art of the American experience.  

You will not want to miss America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age...an exciting and enlightening look at America through the eyes of its most creative citizens.  

Purchase tickets at this link.  

This presentation is made possible in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts' 2017 Electronic Media and Film Presentation Funds Grant program, administered by The ARTS Council of the Southern Finger Lakes. 

Thursday, June 8, 2017

Hartford Film Premiere -- America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age


Independent filmmakers Michael Maglaras and Terri Templeton of 217 Films of Ashford, Connecticut will be at The Mark Twain House & Museum for the Hartford premiere of their new film highlighting art from the era that Mark Twain described as “The Gilded Age.”

America Rising: The Arts of the Gilded Age will screen as a special fundraiser at The Mark Twain House & Museum on June 22 with a 5:30 p.m. reception with the filmmakers and 6:15 screening followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers.  All ticket proceeds benefit The Mark Twain House & Museum. The filmmakers will be on hand for a DVD signing.
America Rising tells the story of how, after the Civil War, American art and American artists came into their own on the world stage. In painting, in sculpture, in architecture, and in music, America found its artistic soul and voice in the art created during The Gilded Age…that explosion of American economic growth, which Mark Twain wrote about in his famous novel, The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today.
Using more than 90 works of art, featuring painters as diverse as Childe Hassam, Winslow Homer, Maurice Prendergast, and John Singer Sargent, and with the great public sculpture of creative geniuses such as Augustus Saint-Gaudens and his Robert Gould Shaw Memorial (referred to in the film by Director Maglaras as “the finest piece of memorial sculpture in America”),  America Rising creates a portrait of a country reinventing itself, after the tragic events of the Civil War, as a major artistic force.  America Rising shows an America poised, through its art, to commemorate its past and invent its future.
$20 Members, $30 Non-members; call 860-247-0998 for tickets and more information or click HERE to purchase.