Monday, November 19, 2012

Lynd Ward Documentary Makes New Jersey Premiere

Wednesday, December 5
5:00pm

Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, New Jersey

Filmmaker Michael Maglaras hosts a screening of his documentary “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.” The evening also includes a guided tour of “Lynd Ward Draws Stories” and the Zimmerli's annual holiday cookie decorating celebration. Seasonal specials in the Museum Store and complimentary light refreshments are also available. FREE to Rutgers students, faculty, staff, and Zimmerli members (with valid ID). $6 general admission.  FMI follow this link.  

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Minnesota Premiere of Lynd Ward Documentary by 217 Films

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

217 Films

CONTACT: Tami Kennedy | 207-838-0816 | tami@maine.rr.com 




Minnesota premiere of new film highlights work of graphic novel pioneer: 217 Films’ documentary on Lynd Ward to screen at Minnesota Center for Book Arts

Minneapolis, Minnesota (November 15, 2012) – Lynd Ward is the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art. The Minnesota premiere of 217 Films’ new documentary “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” will be held Friday, December 7 at 6:30pm. Co-sponsored by Minnesota Center for Book Arts, the screening will take place in the Open Book Target Performance Hall in downtown Minneapolis (1011 Washington Ave. S.). This screening will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras. Admission is free.

 Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this seminal American artist and storyteller, this 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of the “novel without words.” “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” includes recently rediscovered footage of Ward at work filmed in 1937 as he completed his great masterpiece “Vertigo.” Ward’s work chronicles American life in the 20th-century, and demonstrates his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman during the depths of the Great Depression.

This film has been called “Magnificent” (Judith Regan, Sirius XM Radio) and “Stunning” (David Berona, author of “Wordless Books”). The Providence Public Library noted this is a “Mesmerizing film that appeals to a widely diverse audience of artists and illustrators, readers, American social history buffs, book collectors, and those who welcome an unexpected wave of nostalgia for the books of their youthful reading.”

Clips from the film can be viewed at this link.

  More about Lynd Ward: Ward (1905-1985) illustrated more than 200 books and was among the foremost graphic book artists of 20th-century America. His books, prints, and artwork are held by major museums and libraries worldwide. His stories without words, such as "Song Without Words: A Book of Engravings on Wood" (1930), are precursors to the modern graphic novel and are acknowledged masterpieces of that genre. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward produced six of these books, where the storyline was told entirely through wood engravings. A special two-volume edition of these works was recently released by The Library of America.

More about 217 Films: 217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. Terri Templeton is executive producer. The Sacramento Bee called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art), "alive and fresh" (Art New England) and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News).

More about Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA): As the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind in the nation, Minnesota Center for Book Arts celebrates the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and hand bookbinding, to experimental artmaking and self-publishing techniques, MCBA supports the limitless creative evolution of book arts through book arts workshops and programming for adults, youth, families, K-12 students and teachers. MCBA is located in the Open Book building in downtown Minneapolis, alongside literary non-profit partners Milkweed Editions and The Loft Literary Center.

WHAT: Minnesota premiere screening of 217 Films’ new documentary: “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.” Introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras.

WHEN: Friday, December 7, 2012 at 6:30pm

WHERE: Open Book Target Performance Hall 1011 Washington Ave. S. Minneapolis, MN 55415

COST: Admission is free.

FMI: Tracy Doreen Dietzel | 612-215-2528 | tddietzel@mnbookarts.org 

www.two17films.com
www.mnbookarts.org

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Monday, November 12, 2012

New Film on 1913 Armory Show Announced

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

217 Films

CONTACT: 
Tami Kennedy | 207-838-0816 | tami@maine.rr.com

New film highlights the centenary celebration of the 1913 Armory Show:  The exhibition that changed the face of art in America

ASHFORD, CONNECTICUT (November 13, 2012) – Connecticut-based independent film makers Michael Maglaras and Terri Templeton of 217 Films announce that their new film project -- their fifth film since 2005 -- will celebrate the International Exhibition of Modern Art, known as the 1913 Armory Show where many Americans had their first introduction to art that did not look like anything they had ever seen or ever expected to see.

The film will be titled The Great Confusion: The 1913 Armory Show” and is scheduled for release in November 2013.

From February 15 until March 15, 1913, Americans pushed their way through the doors of an armory on the east side of New York City to confront “Modern Art” for the first time.  What they saw would annoy and infuriate some, and captivate, delight, and inspire many. What resulted from this four weeks of mass exposure to European artists such as Cezanne, Renoir, and Van Gogh, and to such Americans as Marsden Hartley, John Marin, and Charles Sheeler, changed how Americans came to understand their own times.  By entering through the doors of an armory, they entered through the doors of Modernism.

The most controversial work in this show was Marcel Duchamp’s “Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2” which was famously derided by President Theodore Roosevelt in an essay written and published for the 1913 Armory Show. Julian Street, the art critic, likened Duchamp’s seminal work to “an explosion in a shingle factory.”

The Great Confusion:  The 1913 Armory Show” will probe deeply into the history of how the show was organized, examine the critical organizational efforts of American artists such as Arthur B. Davies, Walter Pach, and Walt Kuhn, and will explore the impact that the show had on emerging artists, film makers, and writers who embraced the challenges to our perceptions of reality that they saw in 1913 and translated this new way of seeing into works honoring the creative spirit, which have changed the way that all of us answer the question, “What is art?”

More about 217 Films:  217 Films is an independent film company devoted to the American artistic experience.  In 2005, Michael Maglaras and Terri Templeton released their first film “Cleophas and His Own” about the American painter Marsden Hartley's epic narrative of love and loss. Maglaras both directed and played the role of Hartley in this film.  In 2008, they released a second film about Hartley called “Visible Silence:  Marsden Hartley, Painter and Poet” – the first-ever documentary on the life of Hartley. In 2010, with their film “John Marin: Let the Paint be Paint!” they established, through the first full-length documentary on this important painter, that John Marin was one of the fathers of American Modernism. All three films, among other distinctions, have been shown to acclaim at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Their most recent film, “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” was released in 2012 and is currently on tour across the United States.

 The Sacramento Bee called Michael Maglaras a film maker of “Bergman-like gravitas.” His films have been described as “virtuoso filmmaking” (National Gallery of Art) “alive and fresh” (Art New England) and “elegiac and insightful” (Naples Daily News).  David Berona, author of “Wordless Books” has said of “O Brother Man” “This film is stunning.”

For more information:

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Thursday, October 25, 2012

November 8: Lynd Ward Documentary at Penn State Great Valley

217 Films’ new documentary “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” will be shown Thursday, November 8 at 7:00pm in Musser Auditorium at The Conference Center at Penn State Great Valley, 30 E. Swedesford Rd. in Malvern. This screening will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras. Admission is free. Register at this link.

 Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this seminal American artist and storyteller, this 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of the “novel without words.” “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” includes recently rediscovered footage of Ward at work filmed in 1937 as he completed his great masterpiece “Vertigo.”

 This film has been called “Magnificent” (Judith Regan, Sirius XM Radio) and “Stunning” (David Berona, author of “Wordless Books”). Clips from the film can be viewed at this link.

WHAT: Documentary screening of 217 Films’ new film: “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.” Introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras.

WHEN: Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 7:00pm

WHERE: The Conference Center Penn State Great Valley 30 E. Swedesford Rd., Malvern, PA

COST: Admission is free. Register at www.sgps.psu.edu/events

FMI: 610-725-5218 www.sgps.psu.edu

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Lynd Ward Film to Screen at Center for Cartoon Studies: Vermont Premiere

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:
Tami Kennedy
207-838-0816
tami@maine.rr.com 

Vermont premiere of new film highlights work of graphic novel pioneer: 217 Films’ documentary on Lynd Ward to screen at The Center for Cartoon Studies 

White River Junction, Vermont (October 10, 2012) – Lynd Ward is the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art. The Vermont premiere of 217 Films’ new documentary “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” will be held Thursday, October 25 at 3:00pm at The Center for Cartoon Studies’ Post Office Building, 46 South Main St., in White River Junction. This screening will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras. Admission is free.

Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this seminal American artist and storyteller, this 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of the “novel without words.” “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” includes recently rediscovered footage of Ward at work filmed in 1937 as he completed his great masterpiece “Vertigo.” Ward’s work chronicles American life in the 20th-century, and demonstrates his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman during the depths of the Great Depression.

This film has been called “Magnificent” (Judith Regan, Sirius XM Radio) and “Stunning” (David Berona, author of “Wordless Books”). The Providence Public Library noted this is a “Mesmerizing film that appeals to a widely diverse audience of artists and illustrators, readers, American social history buffs, book collectors, and those who welcome an unexpected wave of nostalgia for the books of their youthful reading.”

Clips from the film can be viewed at this link.

The full screening schedule can be viewed at this link.

More about Lynd Ward: Ward (1905-1985) illustrated more than 200 books and was among the foremost graphic book artists of 20th-century America. His books, prints, and artwork are held by major museums and libraries worldwide. His stories without words, such as "Song Without Words: A Book of Engravings on Wood" (1930), are precursors to the modern graphic novel and are acknowledged masterpieces of that genre. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward produced six of these books, where the storyline was told entirely through wood engravings. A special two-volume edition of these works was recently released by The Library of America.
More about 217 Films: 217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. Terri Templeton is executive producer. The Sacramento Bee called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art), "alive and fresh" (Art New England) and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News). www.two17films.com
More about The Center for Cartoon Studies: The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) offers a two-year course of study that centers on the creation and dissemination of comics, graphic novels and other manifestations of the visual narrative. Experienced and internationally recognized cartoonists, writers, and designers teach classes. CCS programs include a two-year Master of Fine Arts Degree, One- and Two-Year Certificates in Cartooning, and annual summer workshops. The school is located in historic downtown village of White River Junction, Vermont. www.cartoonstudies.org

WHAT: Vermont premiere screening of 217 Films’ new documentary: “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.” Introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras.

WHEN: Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 3:00pm

WHERE: The Center for Cartoon Studies Post Office Building, 46 South Main St. White River Junction, Vermont

COST: Admission is free.

FMI: Valerie Fleisher | 802-295-3319 | info@cartoonstudies.org

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Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Lynd Ward Documentary at the New Britain Museum of American Art

Special Red Carpet Event: 217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward will be shown in Connecticut for the first time at the New Britain Museum of American Art

On Thursday, September 27th, Filmmakers Michael Maglaras and Terri Templeton return to the New Britain Museum of American Art with the Connecticut premiere of their new documentary “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward.”

This new film includes recently rediscovered 1930s footage of Ward at work and will be introduced by Michael Maglaras. Robin Ward Savage, the artist's daughter, will be in attendance.

Lynd Ward (1905–1985), is the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art. He is best known for his six “novels without words” produced between 1929 and 1937. His work chronicles American life in the 20th century, and demonstrates his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman surrounding the years of the Great Depression.

Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this important American artist and storyteller, the 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of narrative without text.






Date: Thursday, September 27
Time: 5:30pm Champagne Reception | 6:00pm Screening
Cost: $20

Reservations are required. Seating is limited. Black tie or festive attire is suggested.

New Britain Museum of American Art
56 Lexington St.
New Britain, CT

Contact: Heather Whitehouse
1-860-229-0257 x203 -- whitehouseh@nbmaa.org

More about 217 Films: 217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. The Sacramento Bee newspaper called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art), "alive and fresh" (Art New England), and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News).

A preview of the film and other projects by 217 Films can be viewed at this link.

www.two17films.com

Friday, August 24, 2012

Keith Brown Features Frederick Delius "A Village Romeo and Juliet"

Be sure to tune in this Sunday, August 26 from 1:00 – 4:30pm (Eastern US Time) to listen to Keith Brown's "Sunday Afternoon at the Opera" featuring the works of Frederick Delius on WWUH 91.3 FM in Hartford, Connecticut.


You can also listen live online at this link.

This will be the eighth time over three decades of opera broadcasting that Keith Brown will present the best known opera of Frederick Delius (1860-1934), the one that is regarded as his masterpiece: A Village Romeo and Juliet (1907).

217 Records founder Michael Maglaras was interviewed for this broadcast. He served as executive producer for Stone Records' release of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Complete Delius Songbook. Performed by the distinguished English baritone Mark Stone, accompanied at the piano by the renowned composer and conductor Stephen Barlow. These two CDs can be purchased from http://www.stonerecords.co.uk/shop or Amazon at these links: Volume 1 | Volume 2.

Thursday, August 9, 2012

Lynd Ward Documentary to Screen at Woody Guthrie Centennial










217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward returns to State College for encore screening at Woody Guthrie Centennial: Filmmaker Michael Maglaras and Robin Ward Savage will also present at Penn State’s Woody at 100 Conference

On Friday, September 7th, Filmmaker Michael Maglaras returns to State College, Pennsylvania for a special encore screening of “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” as part of the Woody Guthrie Centennial. This new film includes recently rediscovered 1930s footage of Ward at work and had its world premiere at Penn State University Libraries in April.

This encore screening is part of the Woody Guthrie Centennial.

“O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward” will be shown on Friday, September 7 at 12:45pm at The State Theatre, 130 West College Ave., in State College. Admission is $1. The film will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras.

Lynd Ward (1905–1985), is the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art. He is best known for his six “novels without words” produced between 1929 and 1937. His work chronicles American life in the 20th century, and demonstrates his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman surrounding the years of the Great Depression.

Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this important American artist and storyteller, the 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of narrative without text.

On Saturday, September 8 at 10:50am Maglaras and Robin Ward Savage, the artist’s daughter, will take part in a panel discussion about the film as part of Penn State's Woody at 100 Conference.

More about 217 Films: 217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. The Sacramento Bee newspaper called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art), "alive and fresh" (Art New England), and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News).

A preview of the film and other projects by 217 Films can be viewed at this link.

www.two17films.com

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Lynd Ward film to screen at Center for Cartoon Studies













Just announced: On Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 3:00pm 217 Films' new documentary O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward will screen at the Center for Cartoon Studies. This screening will be free and open to the public. The full fall screening schedule is noted below and can also be found at this link.

September 7, 2012
Centennial Celebration of Woody Guthrie
The State Theatre
12:45pm
University Park, Pennsylvania
NOTE: Don't miss the discussion about this film on September 8th at 10:50am at the Woody at 100 Conference. More information at this link.

September 27, 2012
CONNECTICUT PREMIERE
New Britain Museum of American Art
5:30pm
New Britain, Connecticut

October 25, 2012
VERMONT PREMIERE
Center for Cartoon Studies
3:00pm
White River Junction, Vermont

November 8, 2012
Penn State Great Valley
Time TBD
Malvern, Pennsylvania

December 5, 2012
NEW JERSEY PREMIERE
Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
6:00pm
New Brunswick, New Jersey

December 7, 2012
MINNESOTA PREMIERE
Open Book - Minnesota Center for Book Arts
6:30pm
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Thursday, May 10, 2012

May 21: Lynd Ward Documentary at the Providence Public Library

A free screening of 217 Films’ documentary "O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward" will be held at Providence Public Library on Monday, May 21 at 6:00 pm in the Providence Public Library’s Auditorium (150 Empire Street, Providence, RI).

The screening will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras with a short discussion to follow. Admission is free.

Parking is available at the Providence Hilton Parking Garage, $3/3 hours. Bring your ticket with you for validation.

FMI follow this link.

Film examines art and life of Lynd Ward





Film examines art and life of Lynd Ward
May 1, 2012
by Steven Herb

Graphic artist Lynd Kendall Ward was the subject of the powerful new documentary film essay, “O Brother Man,” shown April 20 in Foster Auditorium at University Park.

Ward, who studied at the National Academy for Graphic Arts in Leipzig, Germany, was inspired by the engravings of Frans Masereel, and their common man subject matter.
Ward’s wood engraving novels and his prints would represent his lifetime search for answers about the condition of humankind and his way of sharing that search with others.

Ward’s work illustrates the labors and issues of the common man. But he never explained his work. His response when anyone asked, “What did you mean by this?” was, “It isn’t what I intended that matters, it is what you see in it that counts.”

Through his training in Leipzig and his exposure to Masereel, Ward was inspired to create “Gods’ Man: A Novel in Woodcuts” (1929), his first graphic novel and the first novel-length story told in wood engravings to be published in the United States.

He would go on to publish five additional novels using wood engraving in the 1930s—“Mad Man’s Drum,” “Wild Pilgrimage,” “Prelude to a Million Years,” “Song without Words” and “Vertigo.”

(Image Courtesy of Penn State Library) In the autumn of 2010, the Library of America re-issued the six novels in a two-volume boxed set entitled "Lynd Ward: Six Novels in Woodcuts."

“Gods’ Man” was published in October. Filmmaker Michael Maglaras who also narrates “O Brother Man” states in the film, “With this book, the first American novel without words, the graphic novel became the province of the subversive where it has happily remained to our own day.”

The film’s overarching premise is that Lynd Ward knew somehow instinctively that his undiluted reality of a world in black and white perfectly suited “an America poised on the precipice of economic and social collapse.”

“O Brother Man” has captured every major facet of Ward’s fascinating life and finds stunning ways to broaden the audience’s appreciation for his work. Maglaras’ remarkable visual juxtaposition of the lead characters in “Gods’ Man” and the 1920 German Expressionist Film, “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” directed by Robert Wiene, demonstrates a clear Expressionist influence on Ward’s art.

The filmmaker’s powerful use of depression-era film clips as segues into the pages of Ward’s graphic novels pulls us into the 1930s and amplifies the novelist’s deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman surrounding the years of the Great Depression.

Maglaras used interviews with Ward’s daughter Robin Ward Savage to personalize the film and provide anecdotal punctuation in careful measures. Stories of tapped phones and cruel classmates remind viewers that Lynd Ward’s support for his politically active father and much of his artistic subject matter were brave choices that might have ended his career at any time in the 1940s and 1950s.

Maglaras chose to present the entire 20 wood block graphic novel, “Song without Words” with its frightening exploration of bringing a baby into the world in 1936. The book ends with the new parents thrusting their baby upward in exultation while Lynd and wife May’s actual exploration of that question resulted in Robin’s birth.
And there is the music, some of which the filmmaker chose long before he started the project knowing its connection with Ward’s art would be synchronous. Darius Milhaud’s American jazz-influenced ballets “La Création du Monde” and “L’Homme et son désir” and Lukas Foss’ “Three American Pieces for Violin and Piano” are perfect accompaniments to Ward’s sharp buildings and the curved bodies of Americans on the verge of despair.

Yet there is hope. This is conveyed through the use of Chick Corea’s “Children’s Songs” throughout the film, in Robin Savage’s stories and Maglaras strong narrative.

The film is brought to a powerful conclusion when Ward turns his art toward another time when the common man seemed most at mercy to the corporate man—the Vietnam War.
“[I]n his woodcut novels Ward documented the injustices in the American economic and social system during the Depression era,” wrote Ward scholar David Berona. “Ironically, the social ills Ward displayed in his woodcut novels [80] years ago are evident in today’s culture.”

Michael Maglaras and Terri Templeton have been invited to return to Centre County with their film for the Centennial Celebration of Woody Guthrie the weekend of September 7-9 this fall.

Woody Guthrie, much like Ward, captured the Depression but with song.

“The test is whether the narrative can be understood if the words are eliminated,” Ward was quoted in the film.

It serves as an interesting counterpoint to the Art Spigelman essay in the Library of America-issued set of Ward’s six novels where he writes: “Wordless novels are filled with language, it just resides in the reader’s head.”

Monday, April 9, 2012

World Premiere: O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward

Penn State University Libraries will host the world premiere of 217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward (1905–1985), the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art, on Friday, April 20, 2:30 p.m., in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park. Full details can be found at this link.

John Greenleaf Whitter: Editor, Politician, Abolitionist, Poet

Coming soon to DVD and electronic download:
John Greenleaf Whittier: Editor, Politician, Abolitionist, Poet.
Narrated and Produced by Philip Ré.

View a preview at this link.

217 Records is proud to be a part of this biography which examines the four main callings of Whittier's life and the influences and turning points which led to them. Audio from our CD recording of "Snow-Bound" is used extensively in this piece. Discover more about this CD narrated by Michael Maglaras at this link.

Photos from Preview Screening of New Film on Lynd Ward

Please follow this link to view the complete photo album.
A special preview screening of 217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward, O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward, was held March 31, 2012 in Portland, Maine at the Maine Festival of the Book. Lynd Ward is the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art.

The screening was introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras, with Robin Ward Savage, the artist’s daughter, in attendance.


Photos by Greta Rybus.

Penn State University Libraries will host the world premiere of this film on Friday, April 20, 2:30 p.m., in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park. Full details can be found at this link.

The DVD will also be available this spring. Clips from the film can be viewed at this link.

More at two17films.com.

Saturday, March 31, 2012

Michael Maglaras Interviewed about Lynd Ward on WGAN














John McDonald of WGAN interviewed Michael Maglaras about O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward. Listen to the interview at this link.

View clips from the film at this link.

Sunday, March 25, 2012

World Premiere of New Lynd Ward Documentary at Penn State University Libraries

Film highlights work of graphic novel pioneer

University Park, PA (March 25, 2012) -- Penn State University Libraries will host the world premiere of 217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward (1905–1985), the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art, on Friday, April 20, 2:30 p.m., in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, University Park.

The film, "O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward," will be introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras with Robin Ward Savage, the artist’s daughter, in attendance. Featuring more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this important American artist and storyteller, the 90-minute film brings the creativity of Ward to life and illustrates his mastery of narrative without text. Ward is best known for his six “novels without words” produced between 1929 and 1937. His work chronicles American life in the 20th century, and demonstrates his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the workingman surrounding the years of the Great Depression.

217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. The Sacramento Bee newspaper called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art), "alive and fresh" (Art New England), and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News).

A preview of the film and other projects by 217 Films, the work of Maglaras and Terri Templeton, can be viewed at www.two17films.com/viewclips.php.

Follow this link to read more about this film in the New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/23/arts/design/motown-piano-restored-postcard-books-film-on-lynd-ward.html?_r=1

Housed at Penn State University Park in the Rare Books and Manuscripts Collection of the Special Collections Library, The Lynd Ward Collection is an example of the University Libraries' strong holdings in fine printing, printmaking techniques, children’s books, graphic novels, and original artwork for illustrated books. A gift from 217 Films to the Libraries has helped to digitize Ward's work and expand research opportunities for scholars and students interested in learning more about the creative process, illustration, and the book arts.

For more information, including physical access and special accommodations, contact Steven Herb at 814-863-5774.

University contact: Catherine Grigor, manager, Public Relations and Marketing, Penn State University Libraries. 814-863-4240; cqg3@psu.edu

217 Films contact: Tami Kennedy; 207-838-0816; tami@maine.rr.com

(Photo: Filmmaker Michael Maglaras interviewing Robin Ward Savage.)

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Friday, March 23, 2012

The New York Times highlights new Lynd Ward Documentary by 217 Films

NOTE: Please follow this link to view the complete screening schedule for this new film. Following the special preview screening at the Maine Festival of the Book on March 31, the world premiere will be held April 20 at Penn State University Libaries. The DVD will also be available in late April. Clips from the film can be viewed at this link.





AN ILLUSTRATOR’S LIFE

By EVE M. KAHN
Published: March 22, 2012

The prolific illustrator Lynd Ward had fans as diverse as superhero-comic-book collectors, the poet Allen Ginsberg and the graphic novelist Art Spiegelman. In the 1920s and ’30s Ward carved woodblocks for wordless books about capitalism’s oppressive side effects.

He showed slave traders, fascists, corrupt policemen and factory bosses victimizing the poor and other innocents, in tales with ominous titles like “Gods’ Man” and “Wild Pilgrimage.” In later years Ward mainly illustrated stories by other authors, but his compassion for the underdog still came through, especially in his 1942 watercolors for Hildegarde H. Swift’s “Little Red Lighthouse and the Great Gray Bridge.”

“This man foresaw how corporate greed could possibly bring down a nation,” the documentary filmmaker Michael Maglaras said in a recent phone interview. He has devoted much of the past two years to a new movie, “O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward,” which will have its premiere on March 31 at the Maine Festival of the Book in Portland.

Mr. Maglaras and the producer Terri Templeton based the film partly on archives that the family preserved after Ward’s death in 1985, and they extensively interviewed Ward’s younger daughter, Robin Ward Savage. She remembers watching her father operate an inky press in the basement and engrave wood slabs without preliminary sketches.

Whenever Ward made a carving mistake, he would turn the block into fireplace kindling. But then his wife, May McNeer, a prolific children’s-book writer, would retrieve the singed carvings. “She just couldn’t stand to see them put into the fireplace,” Ms. Savage said in a phone interview.

The new film includes recently rediscovered 1930s footage of Ward flicking away wood shavings while creating a scene of hillside pastures about to be subdivided. “He might work all night long” to finish blocks, Ms. Savage says in the documentary.

In the 1940s her mother clambered around rocks under the George Washington Bridge, while her father sketched the little red lighthouse. In case the police noticed him and accused him of being a wartime saboteur, Ms. Savage says, “My mother would stand guard with a copy of the contract from the book publisher in her purse.”

Monday, March 5, 2012

Maine Premiere of New Lynd Ward Documentary by 217 Films

Maine premiere of 217 Films’ new documentary on Lynd Ward, the father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific book illustrators and printmakers in the history of American art. Introduced by filmmaker Michael Maglaras, with Robin Ward Savage, the artist’s daughter, in attendance.

View clips from the film at this link.



March 31, 2012
O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward
Maine Festival of the Book
University of Southern Maine - Abromson Center
(see directions below)
5:00pm
Portland, Maine
Admission is free

More About Lynd Ward:
Ward, who illustrated more than 200 books, was among the foremost graphic book artists of 20th-century America, and his books, prints, and artwork are held by major museums and libraries worldwide. His stories without words, such as Song Without Words: A Book of Engravings on Wood (1930), are precursors to the modern graphic novel and are acknowledged masterpieces of that genre. Between 1929 and 1937, Ward produced six of these books, where the storyline was told entirely through wood engravings. Released recently in a two-volume edition by The Library of America, these books will be the focus of O Brother Man, which will highlight Ward's art as well as his deep personal commitment to social justice and the plight of the working man surrounding the years of the Great Depression.

More About 217 Films:
217 Films is an independent film company founded by Michael Maglaras. The Sacramento Bee called Maglaras a filmmaker of "Bergman-like gravitas." His work has been described as "virtuoso filmmaking" (National Gallery of Art) "alive and fresh" (Art New England) and "elegiac and insightful" (Naples Daily News).

Directions to the Abromson Center:

From I-295: Take exit 6B (Forest Ave. North) and immediately move to the far left lane on Forest Ave. Turn left at that first stoplight onto Bedford St. After the Skywalk, turn left onto Surrenden St. and into the USM Parking Garage.

From Brighton Avenue: Follow Brighton Ave. towards downtown until it turns into Bedford Street. Turn right onto Surrenden Street before Skywalk and into the USM Parking Garage.

Free parking.

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Sneak Peek: Excerpts from new Lynd Ward documentary

Follow this link to view excerpts from 217 Films' new documentary on Lynd Ward.

The screening schedule for "O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward" can be found at this link.

Coming spring 2012.

Spring Premiere of Lynd Ward Documentary by 217 Films

217 Films' new documentary on Lynd Ward premieres this spring. Look for "O Brother Man: The Art and Life of Lynd Ward" on these dates:

March 31, 2012
Special Preview Screening
Maine Festival of the Book
USM Abromson Center - Portland, Maine
5:00pm

April 20, 2012
World Premiere
Penn State University Libraries
Foster Auditorium of the Paterno Library -- University Park, Pennsylvania
2:30pm

September 27, 2012
Connecticut Premiere
New Britain Museum of American Art -- New Britain, Connecticut
5:30pm

Lynd Ward is the acknowledged father of the American graphic novel and one of the most prolific graphic artists, book illustrators, and printmakers in the history of American art. A brilliant storyteller and engraver in wood, Ward was also a man with a deep social conscience. His works are a chronicle of American life in the 20th century. "O Brother Man" will feature more than 150 wood engravings, drawings, and illustrations by this important American artist and storyteller.

Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Lynd Ward Featured in Fine Books & Collections Magazine


Fine Books & Collections magazine reviews Library of America's two-volume set of Lynd Ward's novels, Six Novels in Woodcuts. Be sure to pick up the magazine to read the article.

A new documentary on Lynd Ward will be presented this spring by Michael Maglaras and 217 Films. View the screening schedule at this link. More information at www.two17films.com.